Monthly Archives: June 2016

‘Moving On’ Makes A Move To The Finals On ‘Short Film Face Off’

The second episode of this season’s Short Film Face Off aired on June 25th with three more talented Canadian filmmakers. Each had their camera lenses focused on winning the $45,000 film production prize contributed by Telefilm Canada and William F. White.

IMG - SFFO 16 - Ep2Mike Fardy (Moving On), Michael Chen (Lost) and Brett Ferster (Claddagh) joined host Steve Patterson as they each presented their own skill at short filmmaking. There was a mix of humour and seriousness in tonight’s films. A woman tries to convince her partner to take their relationship to the next level in Moving On; a young girl in Lost finds peace through a relationship with a stuffed toy rabbit; the oldest of three brothers has to decide between the telling the truth and protecting his siblings in Claddagh.

While Lost came in third with 10.5 points, Moving On won tonight’s round with 12.5 points by narrowly passing second place Claddagh, which picked up 12.0 points.

It was good to see a mixture of intensity and lightheartedness in tonight’s shorts.  Moving On was a funny look at the age-old struggle that confronts most people at some point: the desire to have things to stay the same versus the need to progress with life. The magic wands were the perfect props; in our culture, they have come to symbolize our desire to have the power to get what we want without pain or working for it. The anguish and sadness suffered by the little girl in Lost was difficult to watch, but it is an unfortunate reality that is experienced by many children in unhappy homes. However, the short-lived happiness she felt by playing with the toy rabbit was uplifting. Claddagh reminded us that we can count on certain members of our family to help us out when a situation feels unescapable. It also showed that help and compassion can come from the most unlikely of people; the sheriff knew the brother was covering-up for the other brother, but gave the boys a chance to disassociate themselves from the fisherman’s death.

Congratulations go out to Mike, Michael and Brett for appearing on Short Film Face Off. All the best to Mike as he ‘moves on’ to the final round. Watch tonight’s episode and the films online at CBC Player.

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‘Never Happened’ Spends The Night Advancing To The Final Round On ‘Short Film Face Off’

Summer is typically the time of year when we can slow down a little and relax outside, whether at the cottage or at the beach. Summer is also an opportunity to watch new blockbuster movie releases from Hollywood or to catch up on old favourites via downloads or rentals through cable TV.  If you are looking for the latest in Canadian short films, however, look no further than CBC-TV’s Short Film Face Off. Now in its ninth year, Short Film Face Off comes to you for four weekends in a row with nine filmmakers hoping to win one fantastic filmmaking prize.

The sought-after prize is a $45,000 film production package with $30,000 coming from Telefilm Canada and an additional $15,000 contributed by William F. White International Inc. The prize will be awarded at the end of this season’s fourth and final episode.

Face Off went through some changes since it last aired in the fall of 2015. Firstly, the show’s broadcast dates were moved to the summer months of June and July. Secondly, William F. White became the newest contributor to the prize awarded to the show’s winner. And, thirdly, filmmaker Nadia Litz made her debut as one of the show’s panelists.

This newest and ninth season of Face Off took place on June 18th. Steve Patterson resumed his role as host of the program. Joining Nadia Litz on the panel of judges were veteran Face Off panelists Mohit Rajhans and Eli Glasner.

SFFO 16 - Ep 1Tonight’s contestants were Jennifer Walden (Painted Girl), Mark Slutsky (Never Happened) and Ross Moore (The Woman in White). Painted Girl looked at the transformation of a young woman by the arrival of her grandfather’s painting kit in the mail; two business colleagues attempt to wipe away the memory of their affair in Never Happened; a young girl and an older man talk about their sibling rivalries in The Woman in White.

Painted Girl picked up 11.5 votes, while both Never Happened and The Woman in White earned 13.0 votes. After a tie-breaker huddle by the panel, Never Happened won and became the first short film of the season to advance to the final round.

These three shorts were a powerful way to start the ninth season of Face Off. It was very encouraging to see the woman determined to keep going with her painting despite the abuse she suffered in Painted Girl. With her strong memories of her grandfather and a growing talent in painting, it came as no surprise that she connected with the subjects that she painted. In Never Happened, you can definitely feel the anticipation and attraction between the two colleagues. Using their phones to delete the affair from their memories was a clever commentary on how technology has become pervasive in our personal lives. The Woman in White showed us how deeply sibling relationships impact our lives in some way. However, it also reminded us to remember the good times we had with our siblings when an unexpected turn happens to that relationship.

A well-deserved ‘congratulations’ goes to Jennifer, Mark and Ross. Good luck to Mark in his quest for the $45,000 production award. Visit the CBC Player to watch the entire episode again or each film separately.

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Female Eye Film Festival Shines A Light On Female Filmmakers

Short film fans can agree that the medium of short film gives the filmmaker the opportunity to bring important social and cultural issues to light. These films have the power to deliver a wealth of information and insight to a viewing public that can rival the reporting made by traditional media. In Canada, social issues concerning women or the plight of Aboriginal and Indigenous people have been featured in news reports numerous times in the past. But filmmakers, in particular female filmmakers, have an opportunity to examine and present these topics by using their own voice and experiences.

One festival that you can visit right now and see some examples of shorts made by Canadian female filmmakers is the Female Eye Film Festival. Running from June 14th to June 19th, the festival is taking place at The Theatre Centre located at 1115 Queen Street West in Toronto. A majority of their short films will be screened on Saturday and Sunday of the festival run. From 12 noon until 2 pm on Saturday, you can watch shorts produced by female First Nations filmmakers during the Aboriginal & Indigenous Film Program. On Sunday, the Canadian Shorts & Documentaries program will feature shorts made by a number of Canadian female directors.

Leslie-Ann Coles, the founder and director of Female Eye Film Festival provided this comment: “The Female Eye makes a strong commitment to our National directors and we are delighted to present a series of short films directed by Canadian women directors.”

Short Film Fan wishes everyone involved in organizing and producing Female Eye all the best for a successful festival!

ATTENTION TORONTO READERS OF SHORT FILM FAN: If you are interested and able to attend the festival this weekend, Female Eye has four pairs of tickets to give away to see the shorts at the festival. Two pairs are available for the Aboriginal & Indigenous Film Program and another two for the Canadian Shorts & Documentaries program.  All you have to do is send an email to Sasha at sasha@sashastoltzpublicity.com with the name of program you would like to attend and she will make arrangements for you to pick them up.

Happy watching, short film fans, and enjoy the festival!

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Who Would You Like To See In A Canadian Short Film?

The gears at Short Film Fan were turning lately.

With the recent blockbuster superhero movie releases of ‘Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice’ earlier this year and ‘Captain America: Civil War’ last month, an idea came up.

Which Canadian character, real or imagined, would you like to see in a Canadian short?

One Canadian comic book character that first came to mind was Captain Canuck. He came on the comic scene in 1975 through the creative juices of Ron Leishman and Richard Comely.  What kind of adventures could he get up to in a short film? From further research, other Canadian comic book characters that have graced magazine stands in the past include Northguard and Fleur de Lys. It would be interesting to see if the adventures of these characters could be translated into a short film form.

What about real-life Canadian characters from history? Would it be possible to take one moment from their lives and turn it into a short film? Maybe Sir William Stephenson, the man who would be the inspiration for Ian Fleming’s James Bond, would be an interesting feature in a short. Could you imagine a Canadian James Bond in a 10-minute short film?

Would all of these ideas work? That would probably depend on a few factors. Financial resources could be one of them. Casting the right actors could be another. But, who knows? Maybe one day these ideas and others will come to life in a Canadian short.

Do you have any ideas of your own? Write your comments below or share a post on Short Film Fan’s Facebook and Google+ pages.

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