Tag Archives: Culture

Follow Atikamekw Man’s Road To Redemption In ‘Red Path’ (2015)

It is well-known that Canadian society is made up of a variety of ethnic cultures. Canada’s long-standing policy of multiculturalism allows each individual Canadian the opportunity to explore and promote his or her ethnic background in a variety of ways, from attending language courses to participating in cultural festivals. For many Canadians, connecting with one’s ethnic background is a source of pride and identity. It can also help someone figure out where they have come from, make sense of the present, and chart a new course for his or her future.

Atikamekw First Nation filmmaker Thérèse Ottawa’s documentary short Red Path (Le chemin rouge), released in 2015, is an emotional look at a young Atikamekw man’s life journey of redemption, forgiveness and farsightedness. In this 15-minute film produced by the NFB’s Johanne Bergeron, Tony Chachai recalls his, as well as his mother’s, substance abuse during his formative years. Forgiving his mother and filled with a strong desire for change, Tony recounts his mother’s final request: that he would become a dancer. Tony’s cousin, Ronny Chachai, is instrumental in helping him learn to dance, thereby connecting Tony to his Atikamekw roots.  Watch the film below:

From start to finish, there was a sense of peace, hope and optimism emanating from Tony in the film. It was fascinating to see Ronny conduct the ceremonial prayer with Tony. It was also heartwarming to see Tony visit his mother’s grave in his dancers clothing, conversing with her and revealing to her that his partner will be giving birth to her grandchild. Finally, seeing Tony dance with his cousin Ronny showed his ultimate connection with his culture, enabling him to move forward to become, in his own words, a role model for others.

Red Path premiered at  Présence Autochtone in 2015, where it  received special mentions in the Best Short Film and Télé-Québec Best Choice Award categories. Since then, it has been featured at the Rendez-vous du cinéma québécois, the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival, San Francisco’s American Indian Film Festival, Vancouver’s DOXA Documentary Film Festival as well as the Yorkton Film Festival, where it received the Golden Sheaf Award in the Multicultural category.

Red Path is compelling and encouraging; it is highly recommended to anyone who is seeking to let go of the past, reconnect with one’s self in the present, and go forward with a renewed sense of purpose for the future. It is also an educational glimpse into life on Atikamekw First Nation. Good luck to Thérèse in her future filmmaking career.

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Guest Post: Canadian Short Films From An Immigrant’s Perspective

It’s always good to receive comments from Short Film Fan readers and it’s equally a pleasure to read them. One of SFF’s newest subscribers, Angela Perez, recently sent in some of her thoughts about Canadian shorts. Angela immigrated to Canada from Colombia a few years ago and has been working and raising her family here ever since. Passionate about languages and cultures outside of her native Colombia, Angela enjoys learning more about the different cultural aspects in Canada. Here’s what she had to say:

 

“What could possibly be a better way for an immigrant like me to get immersed in a culture than watching some locally-made short films?

I came across Short Film Fan one year ago and I loved the idea. These short films are a very fun and quick way for me to learn about the different aspects of the prolific Canadian culture. One thing that I find so charming about Canada is the diversity of the population. As fascinating as it is to know people from all around the world in one of Canada’s cities, it is also interesting to explore the very own Canadian way of living and those everyday occurrences in people’s lives than bring them together.

The films on Short Film Fan focus on a variety of topics, which is one of many things that I like about the blog. In addition, I really enjoy the way that it engages the viewer. Participating in the selection of the best films keeps you not only captivated, but also fills you with anticipation about the next film that will be posted.”

 

Thanks, Angela, for letting us know why you like Canadian shorts and how they’re helping you learn more about Canada. Thanks also for being a Short Film Fan subscriber!

Would anyone else like to write or comment about Canadian shorts or the blog? You can share your thoughts directly on any blog post or send in your note to mkul1973@yahoo.ca. Hope to hear from you soon.

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