Tag Archives: NSI

Guest Post: Three Websites To Watch Canadian Short Films

This week’s installment is a guest post written by Sara Bulloch. Sara is a Creative Communications student at Red River College in Winnipeg. If you are a busy student like Sara, you want to be able to access your favourite Canadian short films quickly and easily, whether you are on a break from class or on your way to or from school.  But, which short film websites should you bookmark on your device for that easy access? Sara explores three of them below.

 

3 Websites To Watch Canadian Short Films

Hello, Short Film Fan readers! My name is Sara Bulloch and I run a blog called PegFilm, which is all about film in Winnipeg. Although, lately I’ve been busy working on my first short film (maybe more on that soon). Anyway, I thought I would share 3 websites where I watch Canadian short films that are all FREE and awesome. I’ve also highlighted one short film from each that I’ve recently liked, so check them out!

 

Short of the Week – “Best Canadian Short Films” 

So many quality short films in one place! The Canadian section is great. I also like that the website staff write about each film (below the video) and not just a blurb, but a description that really digs into what makes each film shine.

My Pick: 5 Films About Technology by Peter Huang

https://www.shortoftheweek.com/2017/04/12/5-films-technology/

Starts slow, but by the last of the five I was actually laughing out loud. Everyone is sure to relate to one of these scenarios. I like how it played around with the aspect ratio. Even with the listicle-like title it uses the medium to mimic the message.

 

NSI Online Short Film Festival 

It’s not really a festival because it’s constantly online, but who’s complaining! It’s purely Canadian and new films are added fairly frequently year-round. There’s good variety from documentary to experimental and even a few music videos. It’s also nice that you can sort it by genre.

My Pick: Her Friend Adam by Ben Petrie

www.nsi-canada.ca/2017/07/her-friend-adam/

This film takes a situation that could have been straightforward – a boyfriend sneaking a jealous peek at his girlfriends phone – and allows it to be wonderfully messy so it feels real. I think the acting in this short is superb. The lead actors are real-life partners. It all takes place in one location at one time and it makes the most of it. Just look at those paintings!

 

TIFF x Instagram Shorts Festival

I love it when these short gems start popping up on my Instagram feed! This year, 8 of the 25 films were Canadian. It’s amazing to see what filmmakers can do with 60 seconds or less. I find watching them to be an inspiration boost, and a reminder that even micro-shorts can be impactful.

My Pick: Tinder Fail by Justine Nelson

www.instagram.com/p/BXrLmcihdkt/

It amazes me how dating apps have changed how relationships come together. Since the viewer of this film will likely be lazily scrolling through Instagram, this film brings a strange moment of self-awareness. It’s also just an amusing concept.

Thanks for reading! Feel free to comment with recommendations as you explore the websites.

 

About Sara: Sara is in her second and final year of studies at Red River’s Creative Communications program. She is also currently making her first short film called Second Opinions. She has edited other shorts before, but this is her first time flying solo. Besides studying Creative Communications, Sara has a background in marketing and random film classes. She loves film and shares her passion with basically anyone who will listen.

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Life Surely Must Go On At ‘Rhonda’s Party’

‘Rhonda’s Party’ (2010) was directed by Ashley McKenzie, written by Christine Comeau and produced by Nelson MacDonald. Rhonda is an elderly retirement home resident who has organized a 100th birthday party for her friend, Margaret.  Unfortunately, Margaret passes away in her sleep the night before her birthday and the party.  The ward nurse, Amy, is faced with the unpleasant task of informing Rhonda of Margaret’s death. The party’s guests have arrived, as well as a birthday cake and a band. But does the party go on?

Amy (as played by Karine Vanasse) in Rhonda's party. Photo courtesy of Ashley McKenzie

Amy (as played by Karine Vanasse) in ‘Rhonda’s Party’. Photo courtesy of Ashley McKenzie.

Check out the NSI’s link to view the video http://www.nsi-canada.ca/2013/04/rhondas-party/

In my opinion, the film dealt with the topic of death very well. Everyone handles death differently, and so did our two main characters. I admired Rhonda’s strength in handling her friend’s passing and her decision to attend the birthday party in the end. Amy handled the death with professionalism, yet showing personal compassion for Rhonda. It seemed like Amy needed to see that party happen for everyone. The party presented some brightness and healing to an otherwise dark and sad situation. Amy’s smile on her face showed that the party truly had a positive effect on the residents.

I’ve seen ‘Rhonda’s Party’ on CBC’s Canadian Reflections, as well as Rewind Channel‘s short film show, Homegrown Shorts. You can also catch it on NSI’s Online Short Film Festival. The film has had the distinction of being named as a Top 10 short film by TIFF in 2011, and  won the $50,000 grand prize in CBC’s Short Film Face Off that same year. I also recognize Karine Vanasse, who played Amy, from other Canadian and American film productions.

For more information about the film makers, check out their website: http://www.grassfirefilms.ca/

 

 (Image source: Wikimedia Commons)

 (Image source: Wikimedia Commons)