Tag Archives: Short Films

Please Participate In The 2017 Short Film Fan Readership Survey

Hey, Short Film Fans!

We’re almost at the end of 2017 and it’s been a very good year for Short Film Fan. The number of visitors and views has increased over last year, while new subscribers have signed-up. Also, more filmmakers (from Canada as well as beyond) have reached out to submit their short films to be reviewed. More film festivals were connecting with the site, as well; in one case this fall, Short Film Fan was an official media partner of the Toronto Shorts International Film Festival. This is all so incredibly encouraging and motivating. It’s an indication that Short Film Fan’s delivery of news, reviews and information about Canadian short films is hitting a positive chord with you in one way or another.

As the creator and publisher of Short Film Fan, it’s my duty to take a look at where the site is now and where I’d like it to be in the future. As you may know, time spent on each Short Film Fan post is done outside of my regular daytime activities. This fact makes it sometimes difficult to keep up with the increasing volume of article ideas and submissions. Tied in to the time spent on working on posts is the monetary cost of maintaining this site. How to find more hours to work on more posts in the most cost-effective way is one priority for me.

Also under review is the structure or format of each post. Currently, all of the articles on Short Film Fan are written either by myself or a dedicated volunteer. While some blog sites tend to lean heavily towards text, others have incorporated more audio and/or video in their articles. How to improve the readability of future articles is also an important priority.

In the end, this is Short Film Fan’s chance to look towards the future and to take the next step in becoming something bigger and better. So, with that in mind, I urge you to participate in the first-ever Short Film Fan Readership Survey. The survey consists of only 10 questions and won’t take long to complete. It’s anonymous and no personal information will be collected. The link to the survey is below:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/F98G6J3

Please fill out this survey no later than December 15th, 2017, 11:59 p.m. Central Time.

After this date, all data will be reviewed and analyzed to get a clearer picture as to how the site should progress.

I look forward to reading your thoughts and opinions about Short Film Fan. Thank you for your participation and continued support.

Regards,

Mike Kulasza

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Romantic Obsessions Result In Tragedy In ‘The One I Adore’ (2017)

When a relationship ends, both ex-partners have two choices. Either they pick up and move on or they remain stuck and refuse to move on. Even though both partners feel the hurt and pain of a terminated relationship, it is no secret that the one partner who was served notice will feel the pain much more. Shock, anger and grief are a few of the emotions that he or she will experience in the days and weeks after a break-up. Some ex-partners will eventually learn to accept the situation and look forward to the future. Others, however, can’t or won’t accept the situation and will even go so far as to demand the other partner come back to the relationship. Begging and pleading through phone calls and emails could eventually lead into physically stalking the ex-partner at homes, workplaces and public gathering places.

The 8-minute short The One I Adore is a frightening look at how far one woman will go to confront an old love and to settle a score. Written and directed by Jason Seelmann, The One I Adore stars Joceyln Anna Lernout as the Ex-Lover, Nicole Henderson as the Beautiful Woman  and Matteo de Cola as the Handsome Man. The Ex-Lover drives through the night into a part of town where she finds the Beautiful Woman and Handsome Man making their way to a restaurant.  Hiding in the shadows, the Ex looks on as the couple enjoy their dinner date together. As the date continues, the Ex continues to hide unnoticed by the couple and recalls happier times with her former partner in her mind. The couple leave the restaurant and make their way to the Beautiful Woman’s apartment. Not too far behind, the Ex arrives at the apartment and finds the couple in an intimate moment. After a moment of grief and anger, the Ex knew what she had to do next. Get a glimpse of The One I Adore in the trailer below:

Here is what Jason had to say to Short Film Fan about The One I Adore:

“Like many acclaimed artists whose works have long inspired me (such as Martin Scorsese, Kevin Smith and Robert Rodriguez), I am fascinated by twisting psychological journeys; dark stories about people responding to disappointments, rejection or trauma. I believe we are all capable of antisocial behaviour if pushed hard enough. Heartbreak is heartbreak. Obsession and violence is equally tragic in any relationship. We are all human beings who attempt love and falter. Are we not all capable of violence, even murder, if pushed to the breaking point?” he said.

 

Short Film Fan Review:

Generally, The One I Adore had a real spooky overtone caused by the musical score and the lack of dialogue. There was an interesting scene where both women toss their hair back with their hand almost simultaneously. That moment almost made it look as if there was some kind of final lingering connection between them. The characters seemed to lack a certain amount of emotion towards the end, however. The Ex did not look angry or upset enough before the murder, while the Beautiful Woman and the Handsome Man did not look fearful or terrified enough before their anticipated demise. A fight or struggle scene, which was not a part this film, would have added a bit more horror or intensity to the story. In the end, The One I Adore was a well-paced short film that does a great job at reminding us that romantic obsessions do have the potential to end violently and tragically.

The One I Adore makes its world premiere in Toronto at the Blood In The Snow Canadian Film Festival on November 25th at 7 p.m. at The Royal Cinema, 608 College Street. Don’t miss your chance at catching this little psychological thriller on the big screen. For tickets, go to www.universe.com/bitsff

All the best goes to Jason on his filmmaking career. Can’t wait to see what short film he and his team come up with next!

Moving Forward With Short Films: Spotlight on Lisa Anita Wegner

Watching a short film can be a temporary stress reliever. For a little while at least, the viewer can absorb him or herself into whatever short they have selected and their worldly cares quickly go away. String a few of them together and you have made a little short film festival that can help you to relax, have fun and take your mind off of things for the time being.

But, what about those who suffer stress as a disability, such as complex post-traumatic stress disorder (c-PTSD)? What if you are the filmmaker, not the viewer, who needs help with managing this disability? Where and how do you reach out for help? Toronto-based filmmaker, actress, curator and speaker Lisa Anita Wegner can shed some light on this serious matter. Lisa is the founder of Mighty Brave Productions/Haus of Dada and the co-founder of Akhilanda Collaborative. Since using filmmaking as therapy for her c-PTSD, Lisa’s film production has doubled and her career has taken her into new directions with considerable screenings of her films in Arizona.

Short Film Fan reached out to Lisa to learn more about how she has used short filmmaking to manage her c-PTSD. Below, she describes in her own words her personal journey.

 

Short Film Fan: Who or what influenced you to become filmmaker? 

Lisa Anita Wegner: I was a shy kid who lived in Toronto with my German and Austrian immigrant family. I remember not understanding English and being really nervous out in the world. I found comfort first in my dressing up and imagining myself as other characters like Wonder Woman, Laura Ingalls, Mary Poppins and Lil’ Orphan Annie. After a while, I wanted to perform these inner imaginations and started doing plays where I needed more kids and sometimes adult help. I got together a neighbourhood Mary Poppins play in kindergarten. In grade two, I asked my school principal to use part of our class time for rehearsal and arranged it so that we would perform Annie in the auditorium.

When I had a project, I was fearless. Kids who had no interest in me otherwise wanted to be in my plays. It felt like I was doing the right thing. All through school, I continued to produce plays with whatever resources I had. I also acted in school and professional plays, eventually touring nationally as an actor with English Suitcase Theatre. I really felt the most whole when I was performing. I kept acting in film and TV and literally never stopped creating my own projects.

SFF: Can you tell us a little bit about your work in the early days of your career?

LAW: Around the turn of the century, I had a revelation: the filmmaker shows the audience where to look. It’s so intimate because you have the audience’s eyes.  That blew my mind. I wasn’t a kid who grew up with a video camera, so I started looking for film directors to collaborate with when I started Mighty Brave Productions. At that time, I didn’t generate my own content; I needed the input of writers, directors, editors and cinematographers. I had final say on every aspect of a production, usually with the director. I also worked as a TV and film actress in Toronto and Montreal.  I was running a small production company known for my comedic work and I was fiercely proud, I was sure I was on the right path.

SFF: In 2009, something happened to you that affected you and your filmmaking career. Can you describe to us what it was and what challenge or challenges it posed for you? 

LAW: In May 2008, I went to the Cannes Film Festival Short Film Corner with my short, The Gospel of Phi. I had known there was something wrong with me for a while, but I had put 200% effort getting ready for my first European film festival. So, I thought I was just exhausted. Once in France, I found myself completely unable to function or communicate properly. There was something very wrong.  I only left my rental accommodation to unsuccessfully get juice. I flew straight back to Toronto without getting to the festival and thought I just needed a few months rest.

When I got home, things got worse and for over a year I wasn’t able to get out of bed and was overwhelmed by the smallest task. I slept about 20 hours a day and I felt like my brain had gone offline. In 2009, I was diagnosed as having complex post-traumatic stress disorder. Later that year, I started receiving help from Women’s College Hospital and started receiving Ontario Disability Support.

SFF: Who or what encouraged you to make short films as part of your therapy?

LAW: From 2008-2011, I spent most of my time in bed with my dog and my laptop. Communicating anything was really hard, and my friends and colleagues were worried about my silence. I used images of myself shot with my webcam first of all to figure out who I was; I genuinely was not sure who I was at that point. I posted these to feel more real and reach out to my friends on social media. Communicating artistically was my go-to mode of expression and making things out of the footage was how I got through my hours awake. When I was at The Gerstein Centre and Women’s College Hospital’s SPEAK ART program, I was also encouraged to make art and videos to move forward. Artistically, it was pure communication; I was at a loss for words so film images were how I communicated with myself and my friends.  These weren’t originally made to be seen by the public.

One of my social media friends was Steve Weiss, a film programmer who screened my previous work. He invited my short film so who am I anyway to Selections 2011 at The Phoenix Art Museum.

Eva Gets a Better Job was also screened later that year at The Herberger Theatre Centre. This was the ultimate encouragement that people in the film community wanted to see this therapeutic work.

Steve then arranged a screening and a talk for me at Short Film Bar, and it was the first time I spoke publicly about how art saved my life. For the first time, I felt like an artist and not someone who couldn’t get out of bed.

Now I can’t stop making work like this. Without access to film equipment, I use my laptop or my phone. Without power, I paint, draw or collage. There is an unstoppable well of stories in me busting to get out in many formats.  Through all this creating, it’s obvious to me that at heart I’m a performer and a filmmaker.

SFF: How has producing short films helped you with c-PTSD?

LAW: My daily art practise keeps my c-PTSD symptoms at bay. Living with a stress disorder, I must arrange my studio days to be as stress free as possible. I continue the intuitive process of creating on my feet and I film it as I go. Editing is where I find the moments that interest me.  I have used a blue screen studio donated by Mary-Margaret Scrimger (from Akhilanda Collaborative) and most days, I create bite-sized photo and video content.  If there is value in a bite-sized project, I tend to take more bites.

Most of my current work comes out as performance, photo and video sketches; however, some of these turn into full-grown pieces. It’s really the creative output that is my therapy. I work largely on my own or with interns. With my imagination primed and focused, my therapeutic workflow is smooth and familiar and is now turning into a body of work. The producing and getting the work out into the world is a benefit I am now enjoying, but it’s the content creation that helps my PTSD.

SFF: Can you tell us more about your short film, The Way Back Home? 

LAW: Kirsten Leila Edwards curated a MASH UP Art Party for the Hercinia Arts Collective in the winter of 2015. I was matched up with The Aerial Mermaid Clone Army which was Ashley Hurlock and Tamara Arenovich, two aerialists who performed as mermaids.  In a few short collaborative meetings and rehearsals, we had come up with a live multimedia performance of three mermaid sisters getting lost in a storm called The Way Back Home.  We had the privilege of performing it multiple times live in Toronto. With the addition of Pink Moth (Ray Cammaert) making music and a third aerialist artist Mary-Margaret Scrimger, we formed Akhilanda Collaborative.  Mary-Margaret brought the blue screen studio into the mix and donated the space to shoot.  As the project developed, I felt it was strong enough to work as a short film. It premiered at the Mesa Art Centre season kick off in Arizona on September 8th, 2017.

 

SFF: Would you recommend short filmmaking to others in your field who may be experiencing similar health issues?

LAW: The reason it worked for me is because visual storytelling is coursing through my veins. When my regular cognition wasn’t working, this form of communication kicked in. I couldn’t complete a task, shower, dress or eat much, but I could stand up from my sweaty bed, and shoot, edit and post relatively complex video pieces. I recommend any form of expression that feels natural and comes easy to the individual as therapy. Because film is so technically easy to shoot and edit now, it is a viable option for anyone.  I encourage folks not to be overly concerned with the content as then it leaves the therapeutic realm. I know that’s hard but just keep making stuff.

SFF: What new short film projects can we look forward to seeing you in next?

LAW: Last month, I completed my first film commission entitled Life on Mars with Thin(k) Blank Human with Barton Weiss Productions in Arizona. It was created for a particular Phoenix Arizona art installation that has not launched yet. There will be an artist talk in Toronto in the winter and Canadian screenings will be announced. This was the first time that my performance persona Thin(k) Blank Human was written for and directed by anyone else. The creative process started in Arizona with backgrounds created and photographed by Rick Tashi. It was scripted in Phoenix and all the performances were shot by me on the blue screen in Toronto.  A super fun creative project to have the freedom to play on Mars!

I’m also finishing a short documentary, Being Inside the Glacier II: Further Conversation, the second chapter documenting the performer experience in Anandam Dance Theatre’s performance GLACIOLOGY that was in Toronto’s Suit Blanche in 2015. And, I’m starting to edit another Akhilanda Collaborative short film about fed-up aerialist French maids. And my ongoing project The Fictitious History of the Haus of Dada has chapters added on a regular basis.

SFF: What is your most favourite film project that you ever worked on, short or feature?

LAW: If All You Have Is a Hammer, Everything Looks Like a Nail is a triptych film made by Will Kwan for the Reel Asian Film Festival by Gendai Gallery. In 2013, Shannon Cochrane of FADO sent me the audition information about Will Kwan’s film. This was the first time since my diagnosis that I had an audition for a narrative scripted film. Working again with my union, I was cast in a meaty role with 16 pages of dialogue.  Without a rig, I’d be driving myself while doing these monologue style scenes with actor Michael Man.

I used to have a specialty of learning lines quickly. It came easy and I worked really hard at the same time.  I wasn’t sure how my c-PTSD would react to the stressful tasks of memorizing and shooting. The shoot days were scorching hot and we couldn’t have the air conditioner on because we were recording sound.  After a few shots, I realized I still had this acting skill set; I was able to drive the car as needed and deliver take after take with accurate dialogue and craft a character for film.  Once I realized this, I had the most fun with the rest of the shoot and really enjoyed acting again.

If All You Have Is a Hammer, Everything Looks Like a Nail was commissioned for a project called Model Minority. I played a real estate agent who is that kind of privileged white lady who claims “we’re not racist [here in Canada]” while saying a slew of inappropriate things. Embodying this character was interesting, as this is a type of racism here in Canada that needs further examination.

Will’s film has been screening in galleries since opening and is currently running until end of November at the University of Toronto Art Gallery at Hart House.

SFF: Based on your experiences, do you have any advice for any short film producers in Canada?

LAW: Most filmmakers are keen to make one short film as a calling card and move on to feature films.  A body of work that represents the filmmaker is so important to have a lifelong career.  And it is the time without executives, where you have full creative control. Enjoy this! Shorts are an elegant, economical way to tell a story and see the benefit of this medium in our current impatient cultural climate. I’d say, never stop making short films.   Figure out exactly what kind of film it is you love, and then keep making it.  When a filmmaker complains about the industry, saying they have made one short film and nothing happened, I say make twenty short films over five years and I guarantee something will.

 

We thank Lisa very much for sharing her very personal and inspiring story with us. We wish her all the best in her film career. To learn more about Lisa, please visit her blog at www.lisaismightybrave.com . To view more her work, be sure to check out www.mightybraveproductions.com and www.akhilandacollaborative.com 

Guest Post: Three Websites To Watch Canadian Short Films

This week’s installment is a guest post written by Sara Bulloch. Sara is a Creative Communications student at Red River College in Winnipeg. If you are a busy student like Sara, you want to be able to access your favourite Canadian short films quickly and easily, whether you are on a break from class or on your way to or from school.  But, which short film websites should you bookmark on your device for that easy access? Sara explores three of them below.

 

3 Websites To Watch Canadian Short Films

Hello, Short Film Fan readers! My name is Sara Bulloch and I run a blog called PegFilm, which is all about film in Winnipeg. Although, lately I’ve been busy working on my first short film (maybe more on that soon). Anyway, I thought I would share 3 websites where I watch Canadian short films that are all FREE and awesome. I’ve also highlighted one short film from each that I’ve recently liked, so check them out!

 

Short of the Week – “Best Canadian Short Films” 

So many quality short films in one place! The Canadian section is great. I also like that the website staff write about each film (below the video) and not just a blurb, but a description that really digs into what makes each film shine.

My Pick: 5 Films About Technology by Peter Huang

https://www.shortoftheweek.com/2017/04/12/5-films-technology/

Starts slow, but by the last of the five I was actually laughing out loud. Everyone is sure to relate to one of these scenarios. I like how it played around with the aspect ratio. Even with the listicle-like title it uses the medium to mimic the message.

 

NSI Online Short Film Festival 

It’s not really a festival because it’s constantly online, but who’s complaining! It’s purely Canadian and new films are added fairly frequently year-round. There’s good variety from documentary to experimental and even a few music videos. It’s also nice that you can sort it by genre.

My Pick: Her Friend Adam by Ben Petrie

www.nsi-canada.ca/2017/07/her-friend-adam/

This film takes a situation that could have been straightforward – a boyfriend sneaking a jealous peek at his girlfriends phone – and allows it to be wonderfully messy so it feels real. I think the acting in this short is superb. The lead actors are real-life partners. It all takes place in one location at one time and it makes the most of it. Just look at those paintings!

 

TIFF x Instagram Shorts Festival

I love it when these short gems start popping up on my Instagram feed! This year, 8 of the 25 films were Canadian. It’s amazing to see what filmmakers can do with 60 seconds or less. I find watching them to be an inspiration boost, and a reminder that even micro-shorts can be impactful.

My Pick: Tinder Fail by Justine Nelson

www.instagram.com/p/BXrLmcihdkt/

It amazes me how dating apps have changed how relationships come together. Since the viewer of this film will likely be lazily scrolling through Instagram, this film brings a strange moment of self-awareness. It’s also just an amusing concept.

Thanks for reading! Feel free to comment with recommendations as you explore the websites.

 

About Sara: Sara is in her second and final year of studies at Red River’s Creative Communications program. She is also currently making her first short film called Second Opinions. She has edited other shorts before, but this is her first time flying solo. Besides studying Creative Communications, Sara has a background in marketing and random film classes. She loves film and shares her passion with basically anyone who will listen.

TIFF Announces 29 Canadian Short Films For September Lineup

Next month, the 42nd annual Toronto International Film Fest (TIFF) will be taking place September 7th to 17th and it promises to satisfy the palates of all sorts of film buffs. From world cinema to documentaries to experimental film, TIFF 2017 is Canada’s, if not the continent’s, largest on-going film festival that features new and seasoned film talent from Canada and around the world.

Of course, no film festival would be complete without short films and TIFF recently announced this year’s shorts line up for its September screening. There will be 29 Canadian shorts at this year’s festival, including 11 directed by women and three by Indigenous filmmakers. 24 shorts are part of the Short Cuts programme and 5 shorts will be shown under the festival’s Wavelength banner.

The complete list is as follows:

SHORT CUTS PROGRAMME

The Argument (with annotations) Daniel Cockburn, Canada/UK

Bickford Park Linsey Stewart, Dane Clark, Canada

Bird Molly Parker, Canada

Charles Dominic Etienne Simard, Canada/France

Creatura Dada Caroline Monnet, Canada

Crème de menthe Philippe David Gagné, Jean-Marc E. Roy, Canada

The Crying Conch (Le cri du lambi) Vincent Toi, Canada

The Drop In Naledi Jackson, Canada

For Nonna Anna Luis De Filippis, Canada

Grandmother (ʔEtsu) Trevor Mack, Canada

homer_b Milos Mitrovic, Conor Sweeney, Canada

An Imagined Conversation: Kanye West & Stephen Hawking Sol Friedman, Canada

Latched Justin Harding, Rob Brunner, Canada

Lira’s Forest Connor Jessup, Canada

Midnight Confession Maxwell McCabe-Lokos, Canada/USA

Milk Heather Young, Canada

Nuuca Michelle Latimer, Canada

Pre-Drink Marc-Antoine Lemire, Canada

Rupture Yassmina Karajah, Jordan/Canada

Shadow Nettes Phillip Barker, Canada

Stay, I Don’t Want to Be Alone (Reste, je ne veux pas être toute seule) Gabriel Savignac, Canada

The Tesla World Light (Tesla : Lumière Mondiale) Matthew Rankin, Canada

Threads Torill Kove, Canada/Norway

We Forgot to Break Up Chandler Levack, Canada

 

WAVELENGTHS PROGRAMME

Heart of a Mountain Parastoo Anoushahpour, Ryan Ferko, Faraz Anoushahpour, Taiwan/Canada

Palmerston Blvd. Dan Browne, Canada

Scaffold Kazik Radwanski, Canada

some cities Francesco Gagliardi, Canada

Turtles Are Always Home (Sokun Al Sulhufat) Rawane Nassif, Canada/Lebanon/Qatar

 

All 24 Canadian Short Cuts films are eligible for the IWC Short Cuts Award for Best Canadian Short Film. All films in the Short Cuts programme are eligible for the IWC Short Cuts Award for Best Film. For synopses of all shorts, go to tiff.net/sc and tiff.net/wavelengths. For tickets, click tiff.net/tickets or call 416-599-TIFF (toll-free: 1-888-599-8433).

If you will be attending TIFF this year, why not show your support for homegrown short film talent and see this year’s slate of Canadian shorts (many of which are world premieres). If you do happen to see any of them, share your thoughts about what you saw by leaving a message in the comments box below!

 

An 8-Film Preview Of 2017 Toronto Youth Shorts Film Festival

If you or anyone you know is a young and aspiring filmmaker living in the Greater Toronto area, the Toronto Youth Shorts Film Festival is back. On August 11th and 12th, a total of 53 short films will be featured in five different programs throughout various locations. This festival is your chance to see some of Toronto’s budding filmmakers’ work in a wide variety of genres, including animation, comedy and drama covering a wide variety of topics.

Aleks Tucovic
Short Film Fan had the pleasure in reviewing a sample of what festival goers will expect to see at this year’s festival. The themes, dates and locations of these films are also included below. Thanks to Aleks Tucovic, an avid Short Film Fan reader and subscriber, for contributing four of the reviews in this list:

 

UNDER THE SURFACE – August 11, 7:30pm, Spadina Theatre at Alliance Francaise de Toronto

But Wait, There’s More – directed by Mike Mildon

In this cheeky 14-minute short, Tim goes door to door on a mission to bring people to God. In his travels, he meets the legendary and disgraced TV marketer, Danny Deals, who teaches Tim a thing or two about sales. The film was part mockumentary, part dramatic comedy in which the costumes and props gave the short somewhat of an authentic 1980s look and feel. There are some good lessons to learn at the end, no matter what you are trying to sell. – MK

Erika – directed by Hanna Jovin

During World War II, a Bosnian and German girl find and stoke a friendship that stretches beyond ethnicity. The acting was excellent and the use of German and Bosnian languages made it feel like the short was produced in Europe. Maybe the lesson to be learned in this film is that, while the first casualty of war is truth, the innocence of youth remains intact. This a great short for history buffs who would like to learn more about Bosnia and its people during the war. -MK

 

UNBOUND  – August 12, 1:15pm, Innis College

Happy Face Hill – directed by Samantha Chalmers

When life drives a highway through one’s life, what is one to do? There’s no better opportunity than to put a smile on everyone who is driving that highway of life. “Happy face can’t always be happy,” says the film’s speaker, however. He reminds us to just enjoy the day, the family, friends and the meal on the table. You don’t know what the day will bring, but having watched Happy Face Hill I know it brought an enjoyable film to my day. -AT 

Nana – directed by Ali Kellner

This animation piece is a personal account of experience of a girl from Budapest during World War II. The film flows from the narration. Where the words established the events, the animation filled with imagery of what was directed in those harsh times. The music which was of somber tone bound together the destiny of people swept up by great historical shifts. The film pulled me in into its humble yet powerful reflections. -AT

PROPOSAL – August 12, 3:30pm, Innis College

The Talk – directed by Tyler Boyco

A husband and wife try to come up with the best possible way to talk to their young teenage daughter about the birds and the bees. The resulting heart to heart is far from the scenarios that they come up with in their minds. Although a bit slow paced, this short made an often uncomfortable rite of passage for all parties involved into a lighthearted comedy. After watching this short, teenage viewers may want to tread carefully while at sitting at home between after school and dinner time. -MK

These Familiar Faces – directed by Maximum Brauch and Raine Akiyama-Chen

This was a spooky story of four people in an emotional group session. The music weighed in heavily on the direction of the film. Going back and forth in creative storytelling created its own story deconstruction. The film’s characters left me wondering about what reality was like for those young enough to remember and those not yet old enough to know better. -AT

 

TRANSITIONS – August 12, 6:00pm, Innis College

Ariana – directed by Astrid Harrison

After losing her love in a car accident, young woman hears a particular tune at a wedding that she can’t get out of her mind. She helps the song’s composer by adding lyrics of her own, which in turn helps her with closure. The short was a very heartwarming story about the tragedy of love lost and the hope in moving on. The car accident scene was particularly shocking and has the potential to make viewers flinch in their seats. The music and singing were beautifully written and scored for the film. -MK

Breath, Maggie, Breathe – directed by Sofie Uretsky

Before undergoing a delicate and unconditional procedure, a conversation between sisters sets the tone of the story. The opening shows the main character strongly composed then shows her vulnerability in dialogue. I liked how her deflection of a doctor’s concern leads directly to the next scene’s reflections with her partner. This was an uncomplicated yet important story. -AT

 

For more on this year’s Toronto Youth Shorts Film Festival and to buy your tickets, check out http://www.torontoyouthshorts.ca/

If you see any of the shorts featured listed above and want to share your own thoughts about them, leave a comment below!

Have fun at the festival, everyone!

View Shorts & Vote For Your Favourite At WFG’s 48-Hour Film Contest

For short film fans living in the Winnipeg area, the summer weather has been very hot and humid this past while. If you are looking to escape the heat while enjoying 27 newly-minted Manitoba-made short films at the same time, come down to the Metropolitan Entertainment Centre on Wednesday, August 2nd  at 7 p.m. for the 48-Hour Film Contest.

This annual event organized by the Winnipeg Film Group encourages the creation of short films made by Manitoba residents. Participants are tasked to write, shoot, edit, score and complete an original short in just two days.

Not only will the audience be treated to some quality short films, there will be a reception after the contest with a chance to win some prizes and an opportunity to mix and mingle with the filmmakers and members of various arts organizations.

Hot off of the 48-Hour Contest premiere at Gimli Film Festival, Short Film Fan caught up with Ben Williams, WFG’s Production Centre Director, to learn more about this year’s 48-Hour Film Contest at the Met:

 

Short Film Fan:  What genre of shorts will be screened at this year’s contest?

Ben Williams:  Actually, every year the filmmakers are given a challenge to produce a film within a set of parameters called “The Key”. The Key changes every year and each year there is a different plot theme, at least two camera techniques and the use of a music score. It is within these parameters that each filmmaker crafts their film. This year the plot theme was titled “The Quest”: There’s comedy, drama, LGBT content, special effects, some action and even puppets in this year’s crop of films.

SFF: Which categories will these shorts compete under?

BW:  At Gimli, there was a jury selection for Best Film, Best Director, Best Cinematography, Best Editor, Best Sound, Best Score, Best Actor and Best Actress. At the Metropolitan, the audience gets to decide on the People’s Choice Awards for Best Film and Best Score. If you attend this event your vote will count.

SFF: Which filmmakers should the audience especially keep their eyes on?

BW:  I can honestly say that this year’s crop of films is stronger than it has been in the past four years. If we judge it by what the jury and Gimli crowd felt… filmmakers like Julie Epp, Cleo Leslie, Michael Sanders, Jhurmel Pasqua, Vincent Tang, Carter Hadlow, Lasha Mountain, John Titley and Lucky 7 Studios (composed of 7 teenagers ages 13-17) each have quality films. The bar is getting raised higher each year and we are proud of the results.

SFF:  Why should short film fans attend this year’s 48-Hour Film Contest?

BW:  There will be a reception afterwards with appetizers and a cash bar served from 6 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. We will have a silent auction with generous sponsorships from: Royal MTC, Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra, Royal Ballet of Winnipeg, Landmark Cinemas and other great prizes. All ticket holders will receive 10% off at Chosabi (printed on the ticket). There will be many filmmakers, musicians, actors, film industry folks, local business arts supporters and arts organizations in attendance a great opportunity to build and network.

 

For tickets to the screening, click on the Winnipeg Film Group’s website: https://www.winnipegfilmgroup.com/event/48-hour-film-contest-2017-at-metropolitan-entertainment-centre/

For directions to the Met, check out  http://www.themetwinnipeg.com/contact-us/

A pair of free tickets is available to a lucky Short Film Fan reader in Winnipeg. Just email your name and phone number to cdnshortfilmfan@gmail.com and two tickets will be waiting for you and a guest at the door.

Happy viewing, short film fans!

‘Hustle & Heart’ Makes $40,000 Touchdown On ‘Short Film Face Off’

The final episode of the 10th season of CBC`s Short Film Face Off was broadcast on July 29th and it all came down to three excellent filmmaker finalists waiting to hear who the winner was of a handsome $40,000 film production prize made possible by Telefilm Canada and William F. White International.  New this season, William F. White contributed an extra $2,500 to each runner-up.

On tonight`s episode, the viewing audience had one more chance to see Roman Tchjen (Parent Teacher), Renuka Jeyapalan (A Bicycle Lesson) and Koumbie (Hustle & Heart) all reassembled onstage before the big winner was announced.

Season 10 SFFO Finalists With Panel.

After each short was rescreened, Telefilm Canada’s Francesca Accinelli and host Steve Patterson presented this year’s $40,000 filmmaking prize award to Koumbie. Congratulations, Koumbie! Congratulations also goes out to Roman and Renuka for each picking up $2,500 from William F. White.

You can catch all of this season’s episodes and films at http://watch.cbc.ca/short-film-face-off/season-10/d611d09a-6397-4a86-a91b-7632cfe86a9a.

It is hard to believe that another season of Short Film Face Off has come and gone. It felt like the contest had just started last week. This is perhaps a testimony to the amazing caliber of short films that were in this year`s competition. Watching a short film can be compared to reading a short story, and the shorts on this year’s Short Film Face Off prove that Canada is truly blessed with creative and skilled storytellers. Timeliness and relativity in their content can also make short films attractive to an audience, and this season’s featured short films certainly had no problems with reflecting the rich diversity that makes up Canada`s population.

Rest assured that after watching this 10th season of Short Film Face Off, Canada`s filmmaking and storytelling future is in very good hands. Looking forward to Season 11!

‘Hustle & Heart’ Throws Long For ‘Short Film Face Off’ Final Appearance

The third installment of Short Film Face Off‘s 10th season aired on July 22nd. Three more filmmakers hit the stage in their quest to take home a $40,000 film production prize made generously possible by Telefilm Canada and William F. White. Viewers were also asked to cast their ballot for the winning film, which will be announced on next week’s season-closing episode.

Tonight, Koumbie was first up with her film, Hustle & Heart. Mike Fly’s short Come To Bed was next followed by Noel HarrisTouch. Hustle & Heart looked at the relationship between two football players; a frustrated couple argues about a weeknight routine in Come To Bed; a single mom in Touch needs a babysitter for her kids so she can go to work and avoid being evicted.

Koumbie, Fly and Harris on SFFO

Hustle & Heart garnered 12.0 points to advance to the final, while Come To Bed and Touch tied at 11.5 points.

Hustle & Heart was a good insight into the stresses and fears that could potentially happen when an attraction to someone is not reciprocated by the other. The friend who rebuffed the advance handled the situation well, considering that the two friends played in a macho sport like football.

Come To Bed was a cheeky poke at how routine a couple’s life can get. It was funny to see the husband/boyfriend speak in frustrated garbles and there was a nice nod to today’s technology when the wife/girlfriend suggested he look at his ‘Fitbit’ instead of his watch.

Touch was an intense examination of poverty and family. It was hard to see the mother struggle with trying to find a babysitter, but it was gratifying to see her get help in the end. It was at first difficult to determine what the man’s relationship was to the family, but the daughter made it clearer later on. The caress of the girl’s back by the uncle was a bit tough to watch and was of some concern with the show’s panelists Mohit and Nadia. However, Noel explained his backstory to that scene very well. In the end, the caress could be seen as an uncle’s affection for his niece as he faces an uncertain future the next morning.

It was a pleasure watching Koumbie, Mike and Noel and their films compete on Short Film Face Off. Good luck to Koumbie as she makes a play for the $40,000 on next week’s episode. To watch tonight’s entire episode or to see any of the three shorts separately, visit http://watch.cbc.ca/short-film-face-off/season-10/d611d09a-6397-4a86-a91b-7632cfe86a9a

For the next 24 hours, you can vote for the short that you think should take the prize by going online at http://shortfilmfaceoff.isivote.com/ or by calling 1-877-876-3636.

 

Short Film Fan’s Prediction: With three films that were powerful and well-made in their own right, it is difficult to pick just one winner. However, Short Film Fan predicts Renuka Jeyapalan’s A Bicycle Lesson to win next week.

‘A Bicycle Lesson’ Rides On To Advance To ‘Short Film Face Off’ Finals

Tonight’s episode of Short Film Face Off was broadcast on July 15th and featured the second round of Canadian filmmakers vying for the $40,000 film production prize from Telefilm Canada and William F. White. While two of the films focused on experiencing a key moment in human life, the third film looked more at the experiences of two dolls’ not-so-pleasant lives.

Letter To My Future Self by Robert Randall was the first on the bill, followed by Renuka Jeyapalan’s A Bicycle Lesson and Trevor Kristjanson’s Boy Toys. In Letter To My Future Self, a teenager struggles with disappointment after reading a letter that she wrote to herself as a child; a young woman teaches her mom to ride a bicycle in A Bicycle Lesson; two dolls in Boy Toys feel the abuse and manipulation caused by their female and male handlers.

Second Round Contestants With Panel

A Bicycle Lesson won tonight’s round at 13.5 points, with Boy Toys coming in second place with 12.5 points and Letter To My Future Self taking third place with 10.5 points.

Letter To My Future Self was mostly serious with some humorous moments about that one key stage in life many of us experience: a breakup of a teenage dating relationship. It was heartwarming to see the teenager open up and share her thoughts to her younger self. The conversation’s tone between the two girls felt good as they were speaking to each other not as elder against younger, but more as equals.

A Bicycle Lesson also dealt with a life stage, but this time it is the stage when aging parents need help from their older children. The film did a great job at highlighting the struggle the young woman had with this situation: how do you juggle your own personal life with the need to help your parents? It would be a question that could not be easily answered as it was evident that the relationship between the two women was obviously strained.

Boy Toys offered a hilarious revelation into the life of two “Ken” dolls as they experience all sorts of abuse and embarrassing situations caused by the kids who play with them. It was especially funny to see the awkward positions the dolls took after being thrown onto the ground; that scene in particular could make anyone cringe and should make a kid think twice before treating his or her toys so roughly.

Kudos to Robert, Renuka and Trevor for appearing on Short Film Face Off with such amazing short films. All the best goes to Renuka as she bikes her way to the final round on July 29th. To watch tonight’s entire episode or to see any of the three shorts separately, visit http://watch.cbc.ca/short-film-face-off/season-10/d611d09a-6397-4a86-a91b-7632cfe86a9a