Tag Archives: Youth Film

An 8-Film Preview Of 2017 Toronto Youth Shorts Film Festival

If you or anyone you know is a young and aspiring filmmaker living in the Greater Toronto area, the Toronto Youth Shorts Film Festival is back. On August 11th and 12th, a total of 53 short films will be featured in five different programs throughout various locations. This festival is your chance to see some of Toronto’s budding filmmakers’ work in a wide variety of genres, including animation, comedy and drama covering a wide variety of topics.

Aleks Tucovic
Short Film Fan had the pleasure in reviewing a sample of what festival goers will expect to see at this year’s festival. The themes, dates and locations of these films are also included below. Thanks to Aleks Tucovic, an avid Short Film Fan reader and subscriber, for contributing four of the reviews in this list:

 

UNDER THE SURFACE – August 11, 7:30pm, Spadina Theatre at Alliance Francaise de Toronto

But Wait, There’s More – directed by Mike Mildon

In this cheeky 14-minute short, Tim goes door to door on a mission to bring people to God. In his travels, he meets the legendary and disgraced TV marketer, Danny Deals, who teaches Tim a thing or two about sales. The film was part mockumentary, part dramatic comedy in which the costumes and props gave the short somewhat of an authentic 1980s look and feel. There are some good lessons to learn at the end, no matter what you are trying to sell. – MK

Erika – directed by Hanna Jovin

During World War II, a Bosnian and German girl find and stoke a friendship that stretches beyond ethnicity. The acting was excellent and the use of German and Bosnian languages made it feel like the short was produced in Europe. Maybe the lesson to be learned in this film is that, while the first casualty of war is truth, the innocence of youth remains intact. This a great short for history buffs who would like to learn more about Bosnia and its people during the war. -MK

 

UNBOUND  – August 12, 1:15pm, Innis College

Happy Face Hill – directed by Samantha Chalmers

When life drives a highway through one’s life, what is one to do? There’s no better opportunity than to put a smile on everyone who is driving that highway of life. “Happy face can’t always be happy,” says the film’s speaker, however. He reminds us to just enjoy the day, the family, friends and the meal on the table. You don’t know what the day will bring, but having watched Happy Face Hill I know it brought an enjoyable film to my day. -AT 

Nana – directed by Ali Kellner

This animation piece is a personal account of experience of a girl from Budapest during World War II. The film flows from the narration. Where the words established the events, the animation filled with imagery of what was directed in those harsh times. The music which was of somber tone bound together the destiny of people swept up by great historical shifts. The film pulled me in into its humble yet powerful reflections. -AT

PROPOSAL – August 12, 3:30pm, Innis College

The Talk – directed by Tyler Boyco

A husband and wife try to come up with the best possible way to talk to their young teenage daughter about the birds and the bees. The resulting heart to heart is far from the scenarios that they come up with in their minds. Although a bit slow paced, this short made an often uncomfortable rite of passage for all parties involved into a lighthearted comedy. After watching this short, teenage viewers may want to tread carefully while at sitting at home between after school and dinner time. -MK

These Familiar Faces – directed by Maximum Brauch and Raine Akiyama-Chen

This was a spooky story of four people in an emotional group session. The music weighed in heavily on the direction of the film. Going back and forth in creative storytelling created its own story deconstruction. The film’s characters left me wondering about what reality was like for those young enough to remember and those not yet old enough to know better. -AT

 

TRANSITIONS – August 12, 6:00pm, Innis College

Ariana – directed by Astrid Harrison

After losing her love in a car accident, young woman hears a particular tune at a wedding that she can’t get out of her mind. She helps the song’s composer by adding lyrics of her own, which in turn helps her with closure. The short was a very heartwarming story about the tragedy of love lost and the hope in moving on. The car accident scene was particularly shocking and has the potential to make viewers flinch in their seats. The music and singing were beautifully written and scored for the film. -MK

Breath, Maggie, Breathe – directed by Sofie Uretsky

Before undergoing a delicate and unconditional procedure, a conversation between sisters sets the tone of the story. The opening shows the main character strongly composed then shows her vulnerability in dialogue. I liked how her deflection of a doctor’s concern leads directly to the next scene’s reflections with her partner. This was an uncomplicated yet important story. -AT

 

For more on this year’s Toronto Youth Shorts Film Festival and to buy your tickets, check out http://www.torontoyouthshorts.ca/

If you see any of the shorts featured listed above and want to share your own thoughts about them, leave a comment below!

Have fun at the festival, everyone!

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